Open and Transparent

Open data has the capacity to let citizens (and others in government) have a better idea of what officials and politicians are doing. This transparency can improve public services and help hold governments to account.

  1. We recognize that the term “government data” includes, but is not limited to, data held by national, regional, local, and city governments, international governmental bodies, and other types of institutions in the wider public sector. The term government data could also apply to data created for governments by external organizations, and data of significant benefit to the public that is held by external organizations and related to government programs and services (e.g. data on extractives entities, data on transportation infrastructure, etc.).
  2. We recognize that free access to, and subsequent use of, government data is of significant value to society and the economy and that government data should, therefore, be open by default.
  3. We acknowledge the need to promote the global development and adoption of resources, standards, and policies for the creation, use, exchange, and harmonization of open data.
  4. We recognize that open data can only be unlocked when citizens are confident that open data will not compromise their right to privacy and that citizens have the right to influence the collection and use of their own personal data or of data generated as a result of their interactions with governments.